[Accessibility] Text version of 2005 plan items

Doug Beattie dbb at linkexplorer.com
Thu Feb 27 13:18:28 PST 2003


I believe I said in the last meeting I would modify some scripts to
harvest, in text mode instead of html, the 2005 plan Accessibility 
items.

The text list is attached.

Doug
-- 
Doug Beattie
dbb at linkexplorer.com
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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Interface
Item: 150 - Feature: Voice Based Input Method Standard
In Plan: yes

Need: Users who have disabilities that make typing difficult, inefficient,
or impossible

Benefit: In addition to users with disabilities that impair their
fine or gross motor skills, many other users would benefit from this.
Dictation is the first and simplest use that has already manifested
itself in commercial products.  Full voice based input would mean that
the desktop and all applications could be run and manipulated with only
speech.  With this capability, you could access your desktop in your
car, in a dimly lit space, any time your hands and eyes are occupied,
or over the telephone, to mention just a few sample uses.  There are
also implications for multimodal applications and desktops.

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Interface
Item: 206 - Feature: Acessibility - I/O Methods Std.
In Plan: yes

Need: To make the variety of toolkits and application and development kits
that are available on Linux and comprise an average distributions gamut
of applications, there need to be standard Input / Ouput (I/O) methods.
The first order of business in making an application accessible is to
simply have access to the information.  Once Output is obtained, it can
then be "spoken", sent to a Braille device, or otherwise manipulated to
best serve the user.  Similarly, Input must be programmatically exposed
in a standard way so that a user can input information in their own
specialized, most convenient and efficient fashion.
In order to make applications and desktop generally accessible to users
with various types of visual impairments, standards like Linux's Assistive
Technology Service Provider Interface (AT-SPI) should be reviewed
and specified.  Such standards would expose information contained in
UIs in a standard fashion and allows Assistive Technology to use that
information and provide alternate UIs.

Benefit: Having standards in this area facilitates all accessibility,
Assistive Technology, and the other features being considered for addition
to the specificationc. It also aids multimodal and otherwise innovative
use of and User Interfaces (UIs) for Linux.
This benefits Assistive Technology Providers and therefore users with
several different types of disabilities.  The benefits also extend beyond
users who are traditionally thought of as disabled and the presence of
a standard means accessibility will flow smoothly from one desktop or
toolkit-based application to another.  The ability to have text spoken
aloud, holds implication for ubiquitous, multimodal, and most of all
mobile computing.  Similarly, magnification support for low vision
users also allows content to be gracefully and uniformly magnified
and otherwise reformed -- the potential benefits for presentations,
interactive workspaces, and mobile computing (e.g., shrinking fonts or
making them high contrast) are immense.

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Other
Item: 142 - Feature: Textmode Only Boot and Installation Standard for Accessability
In Plan: yes

Need: Textmode only boot installation makes it possible to more easily
add in Text To Speech (TTS) or Braille support at install-time.  This is
another form of item 206 except specifically applied to installers,
which often lack easy exposure to IO.

Benefit: Assistive Technology can more easily "scrape" the text from
the installer screen or can be built in as a module on top of textmode.

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Other
Item: 151 - Feature: Text To Speech (TTS), Braille, Magnification Support Standard
In Plan: yes

Need: In order to make applications and desktop accessible to users
with various types of visual impairments, distributions must implement
Linux's increasingly standard Assistive Technology Service Provider
Interface (AT-SPI).  This exposes information contained in UIs in a
standard fashion and allows Assistive Technology to use that information
and provide alternate UIs.  Secondly, a standard for speech and Braille
processing as well as cross-desktop and toolkit magnification mechanisms
are in need.of improvement.

Benefit: This benefits Assistive Technology Providers and therefore
users with several different types of disabilities.  The benefits also
extend beyond users who are traditionally thought of as disabled and the
presence of a standard means accessibility will flow smoothly from one
desktop or toolkit-based application to another.  The ability to have
text spoken aloud, holds implication for ubiquitous, multimodal, and
most of all mobile computing.  Similarly, magnification support for low
vision users also allows content to be gracefully and uniformly magnified
and otherwise reformed -- the potential benefits for presentations,
interactive workspaces, and mobile computing (e.g., shrinking fonts or
making them high contrast) are immense.

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: DevEnv
Item: 43 - Feature: Developer Guide for Accessability
In Plan: yes

Need: Developers need one source of information on how to make their
Linux application accessible and work well with Assistive Technology.

Benefit: An Accessibility Developer Guide would both clarify and simplify
the development methods one must follow to produce applications that
would meet the standards set forth for accessibility.

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Dropped
Item: 5 - Feature: Accessibility Standard for Users
In Plan: no

Need: 

Benefit: 

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Dropped
Item: 211 - Feature: Accessibility Desktop Items
In Plan: no

Need: 

Benefit: 

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Desktop
Item: 3 - Feature: AccessX Standard for Accessability
In Plan: yes

Need: AccessX standard, which makes use of the standard keyboard more
usable for users with disabilities.  For example, "StickyKeys" means that
"Shift" and "5" do not have to be pressed simultaneously to produce the
symbol "%".  For users with limited fine motor skills or who are using
a headstick, this is absolutely necessary.  This is only one of the
features included in AccessX -- other popular Operating Systems include
a nearly identical similar set of features.

Benefit: Users with limited motor skills (this can include someone who
is temporarily injured, as in with a broken arm or hand).

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Workgroup: Accessibility - Category: Admin
Item: 4 - Feature: Accessibility Standard for Administrators
In Plan: yes

Need: Just as with any multi-user system or network, administrators need
the ability to monitor, replicate, separate, and otherwise oversee a users
configuration and settings.  The same is true for accessibility-related
settings.

Benefit: Administrators do not have to setup accessibility options
computer by computer or user by user.

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