[Accessibility] Re: Accessibility Q&As

'janina at rednote.net' janina at rednote.net
Fri Jan 16 11:36:23 PST 2004


Hi, Peter:

I don't disagree with anything you're saying. How can we work this
in--without giving the impression that it's actually finished work, but
important work in progress that's building toward a comprehensive goal.

Peter Korn writes:
> From: Peter Korn <Peter.Korn at Sun.COM>
> 
> Hi Janina,
> 
> I think this is a pretty good answer to a better question.  But the honestly
> proud part of me wants to point out that the "GNOME developments" were a result
> of a lot of very hard and active work by the "GNOME community" (and that
> largely the very hard and active work by a bunch of specific people funded by
> Sun in the GNOME community).  That community has gotten together with the other
> existing efforts (e.g.  BrlTTY, the fine AccessX work, etc.) to weave together
> a comprehensive and open approach for all to use if they like.
> 
> So, I would say that kinda like the Linux kernel joined and helped jell the GNU
> work into a complete OS solution, the GNOME work joined and is helping jell the
> work of various other developers at the console level and AccessX into a
> comprehensive whole.  And that the Accessibility working group of the Free
> Standards Group is the forum and vehicle of that jelling (which is all the more
> "jelling" thanks to the addition of the KDE accessibility community, additional
> AT on GNOME [c.f. Dasher]).
> 
> 
> Peter
> 
> "'janina at rednote.net'" wrote:
> > 
> > Hi, Laurie Anne:
> > 
> > I like the new Q better. Here's a first try at an answer:
> > 
> > Q:      How has the Community responded to the demand for Linux based
> > AT?
> > 
> > In classic fashion, several developers have created applications that
> > support various interface requirements. For example, brltty has provided
> > an interface to the console environment for users of refreshable braille
> > displays. Emacspeak provided a tightly integrated audio-desktop
> > environment for emacs, and Speakup provided a kernel-based screen
> > reader. All three are applications typically used by persons who are
> > blind.
> > 
> > There are other examples, but the more important point is that no group
> > has attempted to address the issue holistically--to provide a full range
> > of support for the range of interface requirements of the various
> > requirements of different persons with disabilities. For example, the
> > issues of someone who does not have use of their arms or hands are not
> > the same as the issues of someone who cannot see. Furthermore, no one
> > has attempted to integrate solutions across all environments from bios,
> > through boot loader, kernel, console, and graphical desktop to assure
> > a seamless user experience wherever a user might need to interface with
> > their computer, or their digital device.
> > 
> > Recent preferences for accessible technology in major markets (such as
> > sales to the U.S. Government) have garnered wider industry attention.
> > The GNOME developments in accessibility represent an important recent
> > response by industry to provide technology which is accessible in order
> > that vendors might continue to be competitive in such markets. Our goal
> > is to provide comprehensive and powerfully functional technologies that
> > users will prefer because they do the job better. We believe this will help 
> > end users and vendors alike.
> > 
> > LaurieAnne Lassek writes:
> > > From: LaurieAnne Lassek <LALassek at accesspr.com>
> > >
> > >    Doug - you raise some good points about the Q below.
> > >
> > >    My 2 cents is that the nature of a Q&A is that we design Qs to be
> > >    difficult, like this, in order to anticipate Qs that might come up in the
> > >    course of a press interview. This is the type of question that might be
> > >    asked, in some fashion, so we can certainly change it to be broader:
> > >
> > >    How has the Community responded to the demand for Linux based AT?
> > >
> > >    Thanks,
> > >
> > >    -LAL
> > >
> > >    -----Original Message-----
> > >    From: Doug Beattie [mailto:dbb at linkexplorer.com]
> > >    Sent: Friday, January 16, 2004 9:42 AM
> > >    To: LALassek at accesspr.com
> > >    Cc: janina at rednote.net; mcneil at freestandards.org; dbb at freestandards.org
> > >    Subject: Re: Accessibility Q&As
> > >
> > >    LaurieAnne:
> > >
> > >    Re:
> > >    On Thu, Jan 15, 2004 at 04:24:58PM -0700, Doug Beattie wrote:
> > >    > LaurieAnne:
> > >    >
> > >    > See attached text file with eight (8) general questions and even more
> > >    > answers.
> > >    >
> > >    ...
> > >    >
> > >    > Q2. How many developers are currently using Linux to make AT available
> > >    > to the broader community today?
> > >    >
> > >    > A. See the Linux Accessibility Resource Site (LARS) website
> > >    > http://www.tracecenter.org/linux/ for a collection of AT projects, each
> > >    > of which has probably 1 to 5 key developers (and many others making
> > >    > smaller contributions).
> > >    >
> > >    > Also see "Why Open Source Software / Free Software (OSS/FS)? Look at
> > >    > the Numbers!" at http://www.dwheeler.com/oss_fs_why.html
> > >    ...
> > >    >
> > >
> > >    I really don't like this question or the answer. I don't believe it
> > >    helps us either way to know/guess how many developers are working in
> > >    the open source community on AT at this time. If we have a lot then
> > >    why would we need more? If we don't have many is it because it is
> > >    not a priority? One could make as much negative of such a question
> > >    as positive from it and as we don't have _good_ statistics with
> > >    reasons to back them up I'd prefer we eliminate/avoid this area for
> > >    now.
> > >
> > >    What do the rest of you think?
> > >
> > >    Doug
> > >    --
> > >    Doug Beattie
> > >    dbb at freestandards.org
> > 
> > --
> > 
> > Janina Sajka
> > Email: janina at rednote.net
> > Phone: (202) 408-8175
> > 
> > Director, Technology Research and Development
> > American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
> > http://www.afb.org
> > 
> > Chair, Accessibility Work Group
> > Free Standards Group
> > http://accessibility.freestandards.org
> > 
> > _______________________________________________
> > Accessibility mailing list
> > Accessibility at freestandards.org
> > http://www.freestandards.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/accessibility

-- 
	
Janina Sajka
Email: janina at rednote.net		
Phone: (202) 408-8175

Director, Technology Research and Development
American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
http://www.afb.org

Chair, Accessibility Work Group
Free Standards Group
http://accessibility.freestandards.org




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