[bitcoin-dev] request BIP number for: "Support for Datastream Compression"

Peter Tschipper peter.tschipper at gmail.com
Wed Nov 11 19:11:13 UTC 2015


If that were true then we wouldn't need to gzip large files before
sending them over the internet.  Data compression generally helps
transmission speed as long as the amount of compression is high enough
and the time it takes is low enough to make it worthwhile.  On a
corporate LAN it's generally not worthwhile unless you're dealing with
very large files, but over a corporate WAN or the internet where network
latency can be high it is IMO a worthwhile endevor.



On 11/11/2015 10:49 AM, Marco Pontello wrote:
> A random thought: aren't most communication over a data link already
> compressed, at some point?
> When I used a modem, we had the V.42bis protocol. Now, nearly all ADSL
> connections using PPPoE, surely are. And so on.
> I'm not sure another level of generic, data agnostic kind of
> compression will really give us some real-life practical advantage
> over that.
>
> Something that could take advantage of of special knowledge of the
> specific data, instead, would be an entirely different matter.
>
> Just my 2c.
>
> On Wed, Nov 11, 2015 at 7:35 PM, Peter Tschipper via bitcoin-dev
> <bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org
> <mailto:bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org>> wrote:
>
>     Here are the latest results on compression ratios for the first
>     295,000 blocks, compressionlevel=6.  I think there are more than
>     enough datapoints for statistical significance. 
>
>     Results are very much similar to the previous test.   I'll work on
>     getting a comparison between how much time savings/loss in time
>     there is when syncing the blockchains: compressed vs
>     uncompressed.  Still, I think it's clear that serving up
>     compressed blocks, at least historical blocks, will be of benefit
>     for those that have bandwidth caps on their internet connections.
>
>     The proposal, so far is fairly simple:
>     1) compress blocks with some compression library: currently zlib
>     but I can investigate other possiblities
>     2) As a fall back we need to advertise compression as a service. 
>     That way we can turn off compression AND decompression completely
>     if needed.
>     3) Do the compression at the datastream level in the code. 
>     CDataStream is the obvious place.
>
>
>     Test Results:
>
>     range = block size range
>     ubytes = average size of uncompressed blocks
>     cbytes = average size of compressed blocks
>     ctime = average time to compress
>     dtime = average time to decompress
>     cmp_ratio% = compression ratio
>     datapoints = number of datapoints taken
>
>     range       ubytes    cbytes    ctime    dtime    cmp_ratio%   
>     datapoints
>     0-250b      215            189    0.001    0.000    12.40        
>         91280
>     250-500b    438            404    0.001    0.000    7.85          
>       13217
>     500-1KB     761            701    0.001    0.000   
>     7.86               11434
>     1KB-10KB    4149    3547    0.001    0.000      14.51            
>     52180
>     10KB-100KB  41934    32604    0.005    0.001    22.25         82890
>     100KB-200KB 146303    108080    0.016    0.001    26.13    29886
>     200KB-300KB 243299    179281    0.025    0.002    26.31    25066
>     300KB-400KB 344636    266177    0.036    0.003    22.77    4956
>     400KB-500KB 463201    356862    0.046    0.004    22.96    3167
>     500KB-600KB 545123    429854    0.056    0.005    21.15    366
>     600KB-700KB 647736    510931    0.065    0.006    21.12    254
>     700KB-800KB 746540    587287    0.073    0.008    21.33    294
>     800KB-900KB 868121    682650    0.087    0.008    21.36    199
>     900KB-1MB   945747    726307    0.091    0.010    23.20    304
>
>     On 10/11/2015 8:46 AM, Jeff Garzik via bitcoin-dev wrote:
>>     Comments:
>>
>>     1) cblock seems a reasonable way to extend the protocol.  Further
>>     wrapping should probably be done at the stream level.
>>
>>     2) zlib has crappy security track record.
>>
>>     3) A fallback path to non-compressed is required, should
>>     compression fail or crash.
>>
>>     4) Most blocks and transactions have runs of zeroes and/or highly
>>     common bit-patterns, which contributes to useful compression even
>>     at smaller sizes.  Peter Ts's most recent numbers bear this out.
>>      zlib has a dictionary (32K?) which works well with repeated
>>     patterns such as those you see with concatenated runs of
>>     transactions.
>>
>>     5) LZO should provide much better compression, at a cost of CPU
>>     performance and using a less-reviewed, less-field-tested library.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Tue, Nov 10, 2015 at 11:30 AM, Tier Nolan via bitcoin-dev
>>     <bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org
>>     <mailto:bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org>> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>         On Tue, Nov 10, 2015 at 4:11 PM, Peter Tschipper
>>         <peter.tschipper at gmail.com
>>         <mailto:peter.tschipper at gmail.com>> wrote:
>>
>>             There are better ways of sending new blocks, that's
>>             certainly true but for sending historical blocks and
>>             seding transactions I don't think so.  This PR is really
>>             designed to save bandwidth and not intended to be a huge
>>             performance improvement in terms of time spent sending.
>>
>>
>>         If the main point is for historical data, then sticking to
>>         just blocks is the best plan.
>>
>>         Since small blocks don't compress well, you could define a
>>         "cblocks" message that handles multiple blocks (just
>>         concatenate the block messages as payload before compression). 
>>
>>         The sending peer could combine blocks so that each cblock is
>>         compressing at least 10kB of block data (or whatever is
>>         optimal).  It is probably worth specifying a maximum size for
>>         network buffer reasons (either 1MB or 1 block maximum).
>>
>>         Similarly, transactions could be combined together and
>>         compressed "ctxs".  The inv messages could be modified so
>>         that you can request groups of 10-20 transactions.  That
>>         would depend on how much of an improvement compressed
>>         transactions would represent.
>>
>>         More generally, you could define a message which is a
>>         compressed message holder.  That is probably to complex to be
>>         worth the effort though.
>>
>>          
>>
>>>
>>>             On Tue, Nov 10, 2015 at 5:40 AM, Johnathan Corgan via
>>>             bitcoin-dev <bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org
>>>             <mailto:bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org>> wrote:
>>>
>>>                 On Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 5:58 PM, gladoscc via
>>>                 bitcoin-dev <bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org
>>>                 <mailto:bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org>> wrote:
>>>                  
>>>
>>>                     I think 25% bandwidth savings is certainly
>>>                     considerable, especially for people running full
>>>                     nodes in countries like Australia where internet
>>>                     bandwidth is lower and there are data caps.
>>>
>>>
>>>                 ​ This reinforces the idea that such trade-off
>>>                 decisions should be be local and negotiated between
>>>                 peers, not a required feature of the network P2P.​
>>>                  
>>>
>>>                 -- 
>>>                 Johnathan Corgan
>>>                 Corgan Labs - SDR Training and Development Services
>>>                 http://corganlabs.com
>>>
>>>                 _______________________________________________
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>>>                 <mailto:bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org>
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>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
>>
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