<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    On 06/19/2013 08:19 AM, Melvin Carvalho wrote:<br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAKaEYhJh4ArCqxf+wFobNzMbyd8TDPWEDw_n7_mm78d_41oFbA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr"><br>
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <div class="gmail_quote">Generally in favour of hierarchical
            deterministic wallets.<br>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>Will this new style of address make it into the block
              chain?&nbsp; I'd be less keen on that.<br>
              <br>
            </div>
            <div>I'm finding BIP0032 quite hard to read right now, but
              perhaps that's because I'm less familiar with the material
              than some.&nbsp; However, there's little things like it never
              actually defines a deterministic wallet in the Abstract.&nbsp;
              But, I'll keep trying to understand and see if I can use
              the test vectors.<br>
            </div>
            <div>&nbsp;</div>
            <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
              .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
              <div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><span class="HOEnZb"><font
                    color="#888888"> </font></span><br>
              </div>
            </blockquote>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    This has nothing to do with the blockchain.&nbsp; This is simply an
    alternate way to encode an address, in the event that you want to
    prove that this address is linked to another address.&nbsp; The same
    thing ends up in the blockchain, either way.<br>
    <br>
    Either:<br>
    (1) I give you a Hash160 address which shows up in the blockchain<br>
    or<br>
    (2) I give you {PubKey, Mult}, then you compute PubKey*Mult then
    hash it to get the same Hash160 I would've given you in (1)<br>
    <br>
    I can always give you version #1, and that's what everyone does
    right now.&nbsp; Version #2 is essentially the same, but used if you want
    to give the other party extra information (such as the root public
    key, so that the next time you send a version#2 address they can see
    they are from the same root public key).&nbsp;
  </body>
</html>