<div dir="ltr">I think you misunderstood my statement. If time &gt; 3 days, and after 4 blocks have been mined, then difficulty would be reset.<div><br></div><div>In theory, one would have to isolate roughly one percent of the Bitcoin network&#39;s hashing power to do so. Which would indicate an attack by a state actor as opposed to anything else. Arguably, the safest way to run Bitcoin is through a proprietary dial-up network.</div>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Dec 22, 2013 at 7:22 PM, Mark Friedenbach <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mark@monetize.io" target="_blank">mark@monetize.io</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----<br>
Hash: SHA1<br>
<br>
Ryan, these sort of adjustments introduce security risks. If you were<br>
isolated from the main chain by a low-hashpower attacker, how would<br>
you know? They&#39;d need just three days without you noticing that<br>
network block generation has stalled - maybe they wait for a long<br>
weekend - then after that the block rate is normal but completely<br>
controlled by the attacker (and isolated from mainnet).<br>
<br>
There are fast acting alternative difficulty adjustment algorithms<br>
being explored by some alts, such as the 9-block interval, 144-block<br>
window, Parks-McClellan FIR filter used by Freicoin to recover from<br>
just such a mining bubble. If it were to happen to bitcoin, there<br>
would be sophisticated alternative to turn to, and enough time to make<br>
the change.<br>
<div><div class="h5"><br>
On 12/22/2013 07:10 PM, Ryan Carboni wrote:<br>
&gt; I think Bitcoin should have a sanity check: after three days if<br>
&gt; only four blocks have been mined, difficulty should be adjusted<br>
&gt; downwards.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; This might become important in the near future. I project a<br>
&gt; Bitcoin mining bubble.<br>
&gt;<br>
</div></div>-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----<br>
Version: GnuPG v1.4.14 (GNU/Linux)<br>
Comment: GPGTools - <a href="http://gpgtools.org" target="_blank">http://gpgtools.org</a><br>
Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - <a href="http://www.enigmail.net/" target="_blank">http://www.enigmail.net/</a><br>
<br>
iQIcBAEBAgAGBQJSt6yGAAoJEAdzVfsmodw4SegQAIJAWW0OgSjediSWq+EpkReS<br>
qMvC2Y9dmVHtowYLdJVcgwFWbpU8RhA6ApQ1Ks2XF4t0hFCObYDecG6Nl3OIaLfb<br>
snz24v8ymdxYXKNtzHHUP0VBgsaoRghIpkbf7JMUXC22sxPoPOXFt5RevLgJHrvc<br>
oGFZSIcEcGgwhwZ745CgFZLwaKuSmg5+wFFcrjIihlHKJOl47Z7rzeqnD6mf2Oi3<br>
hDpRuVbuhlGMliYcmhk1E6oV0in2R4Purw1WtoY8C9DxrSP2za7W1oeCkmlFfJZS<br>
to6SzRj7nEIl0LFaPGsIdBrRdDHfvu6eP2OecI+GNLEwLY6qE5v5fkh47mcDkrN0<br>
02PmepoX5PRzBqp4sx8WaFKuRbmTRRr3E4i9PGoyzTckkZzq+zFmb1y5fwOy17hE<br>
C+nP+DyuaPzjypjdo6V+/oGzUKtuKPtqcB1vurbm+WBl5C1jWosAXv5pR87mdCUJ<br>
+0e14wPra5blV6yBVqX7yx+2heDGymPKfHJ8i76Dtix7XVOJWKVY4OpIxO7YrYv8<br>
IKcIswoKhZdSDOJLcjm4Qp4hrzgCHAHWx6vN71r5r2T6zaJTOvp98GS04Yy7VGAr<br>
j38hojcwvJC1ahER3LV/vC0cqO+fxrvY8Q9rW2cUxCnzxzjjG0+Z/gjW8uh73lXN<br>
DOTF7jpt0ZmCm7uhG9z7<br>
=5Q2H<br>
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>