<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Yes, you can reorg out the blocks and actually remove them, but I<br>
</blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
understood that you were _not_ proposing that quite specifically. But<br>
instead proposed without reorging taking txouts that were previously<br>
assigned to one party and simply assigning them to others.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Well, my original thought was just to delete the coinbases. But then some people don&#39;t like the idea of destroying money (equivalently, reducing the system&#39;s resolution) so I proposed reallocating it instead. I&#39;m not sure which is better though. Deletion is closer to what the existing system allows, for sure.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Would you feel differently if the consequence was UTXO deletion rather than reallocation? I think the difference makes no impact to the goal of discouraging double spending.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="">... proposing the mechanism be used to claw back mining income from a<br></div>
hardware vendor accused of violating its agreements on the amount of<br>
self mining / mining on customers hardware.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think this would not be doable in practice, unless there was a way to identify that a block was mined with pre-sold equipment. Peter points out that the pool in question is marking their blocks by reusing addresses - ditto for the double spending against dice sites - but that&#39;s a trivial thing for them to fix. Then it&#39;d be difficult (impossible?) for miners to identify KnC blocks even if there was a strong majority consensus to delete their coinbases.</div>
<div><br></div><div>The reason I think this particular change is doable is that it should be possible to quite reliably identify blocks that are Finney attacking for profit. That doesn&#39;t generalise to any policy though. Blocks are intended to be structurally identical to each other if best practices are followed and even with the dire pool situation a big chunk of mining hash power today is effectively anonymous.</div>
<div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div></div>