<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><p dir="ltr">Stop trying to dictate block growth limits.  Block size will be determined by competition between miners and availability of transactions, not through hard-coded limits.</p></blockquote><div>Do you even game theory, bro? It doesn&#39;t work that way.</div><div><br></div><div>Mike Hearn described the problem in this article:</div><div><a href="https://medium.com/@octskyward/hashing-7d04a887acc8">https://medium.com/@octskyward/hashing-7d04a887acc8</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>But the solution he&#39;s proposing is ridiculously bad and unsound: he expects business owners to donate large sums of money towards mining. If it comes to this, what sane business owner will donate, say, 100 BTC to miners instead of seeking some alternatives? Proof-of-stake coins are already there. I&#39;m well aware of theoretical issues with PoS security, but those theoretical issues aren&#39;t as bad as donation-funded cryptocurrency security.</div><div><br></div><div>But you know what works? Mining fees + block size limit.</div><div>Users and merchants are interested in their transactions being confirmed, but block size limit won&#39;t allow it to turn into a race to bottom.</div><div>This is actually game-theoretically sound.</div><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><p dir="ltr">  I see now the temporary 1MB limit was a mistake.  It should have gone in as a dynamic limit that scales with average block size.</p></blockquote><div>This means that miners will control it, and miners couldn&#39;t care less about things like decentralization and about problems of ordinary users. This means that in this scenario Bitcoin will be 100% controlled by few huge-ass mining operations.</div><div><br></div><div>Possibly a single operation. We already saw <a href="http://GHASH.IO">GHASH.IO</a> using 51% of total hashpower. Is that what you want?</div><div><br></div><div>Miners are NOT benevolent. This was already demonstrated. They are greedy.</div></div></div></div>