<div dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">Might I suggest that the </span><span class="" style="font-size:12.8000001907349px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">min</span><span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">-</span><span class="" style="font-size:12.8000001907349px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">spec</span><span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">, if developed, target the RISC-V Rocket architecture (running on FPGA, I suppose) as a reference point for performance? This may be much lower performance than desirable, however, it means that we don&#39;t lock people into using large-vendor chipsets which have unknown, or known to be bad, security properties such as Intel AMT.</span><div style="font-size:12.8000001907349px"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">In general, targeting open hardware seems to me to be more critical than performance metrics for the long term health of Bitcoin, however, performance is still important.<div><br></div><div>Does anyone know how the RISC-V FPGA performance stacks up to, say, a Raspberry Pi?</div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 10:52 PM, Owen Gunden <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ogunden@phauna.org" target="_blank">ogunden@phauna.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I&#39;m also a user who runs a full node, and I also like this idea. I think Gavin has done some back-of-the-envelope calculations around this stuff, but nothing so clearly defined as what you propose.<span class=""><br>
<br>
On 07/02/2015 08:33 AM, Mistr Bigs wrote:<br>
</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class="">
I&#39;m an end user running a full node on an aging laptop.<br>
I think this is a great suggestion! I&#39;d love to know what system<br>
requirements are needed for running Bitcoin Core.<br>
<br>
On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 6:04 AM, Jean-Paul Kogelman<br></span><span class="">
&lt;<a href="mailto:jeanpaulkogelman@me.com" target="_blank">jeanpaulkogelman@me.com</a> &lt;mailto:<a href="mailto:jeanpaulkogelman@me.com" target="_blank">jeanpaulkogelman@me.com</a>&gt;&gt; wrote:<br>
<br>
    I’m a game developer. I write time critical code for a living and<br>
    have to deal with memory, CPU, GPU and I/O budgets on a daily basis.<br>
    These budgets are based on what we call a minimum specification (of<br>
    hardware); min spec for short. In most cases the min spec is based<br>
    on entry model machines that are available during launch, and will<br>
    give the user an enjoyable experience when playing our games.<br>
    Obviously, we can turn on a number of bells and whistles for people<br>
    with faster machines, but that’s not the point of this mail.<br>
<br>
    The point is, can we define a min spec for Bitcoin Core? The number<br>
    one reason for this is: if you know how your changes affect your<br>
    available budgets, then the risk of breaking something due to<br>
    capacity problems is reduced to practically zero.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br></span><span class="">
_______________________________________________<br>
bitcoin-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org" target="_blank">bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/bitcoin-dev" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/bitcoin-dev</a><br>
<br>
</span></blockquote><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">
_______________________________________________<br>
bitcoin-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org" target="_blank">bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/bitcoin-dev" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/bitcoin-dev</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>