<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jul 31, 2015 at 7:15 AM, Mike Hearn via bitcoin-dev <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org" target="_blank">bitcoin-dev@lists.linuxfoundation.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><span class=""><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">He is not saying that. Whatever the reasons for centralization are, it<br>
is obvious that increasing the size won&#39;t help.<br></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>It&#39;s not obvious. Quite possibly bigger blocks == more users == more nodes and more miners.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Well, even in a centralized scheme you can have more users, more nodes and more miners. Just having more does not mean that the system isn&#39;t centralized, for example we can point to many centralized services such as PayPal that have trillions of users.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>To repeat: it&#39;s not obvious to me at all that everything wrong with Bitcoin can be solved by shrinking blocks. I don&#39;t think that&#39;s going to suddenly make everything magically more decentralised.<br></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Nobody claimed that moving to smaller blocks would &quot;solve everything wrong with Bitcoin&quot;.</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>You cannot &quot;destroy Bitcoin through centralization&quot; by adjusting a single constant in the source code.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Why not? That&#39;s exactly the sort of change that would be useful to do so, in tandem with some forms of campaigning.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>The motivation is profit, and profits are higher when there are more users to sell to. This is business 101.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I am confused here; is that idea operating under an assumption (or rule) like &quot;we shouldn&#39;t count aggregate transactions as representing multiple other transactions from other users&quot; or something? I have seen this idea in a few places, and it would be useful to get a fix on where it&#39;s coming from. Does this belief extend to P2SH and multisig...?</div><div><br></div></div><div class="gmail_signature">- Bryan<br><a href="http://heybryan.org/" target="_blank">http://heybryan.org/</a><br>1 512 203 0507</div>
</div></div>