<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 2:12 AM, Luzius Meisser <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:luzius.meisser@gmail.com" target="_blank">luzius.meisser@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">I agree that flex cap is promising. However, for it to be a viable<br>
long-term solution, it must not depend on significant block subsidies<br>
to work as the block subsidy will become less and less relevant over<br>
time</blockquote><div><br></div><div>There is another variant of the Flex Cap approach that allows miners to pay with a slightly higher difficulty target instead of deferring a portion of subsidy to later blocks.  I think the HK presentation was about the subsidy deferral variant because of miner feedback that they preferred that approach.</div><div><br></div><div>Myself and a few other developers think proposals like BIP100 where the block size is subject to a vote by the miners is suboptimal because this type of vote is costless.  You were astute in recognizing in your post it&#39;s a good thing to somehow align the global marginal cost with the miner&#39;s incentive.  I feel a costless vote is not great because it aligns only to the miner&#39;s marginal cost, and not the marginal cost to the entire flood network.  Flex Cap is superior as &quot;vote&quot; mechanism as there is an actual cost associated, allowing block size to grow with actual demand.</div><div><br></div><div>Warren</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>