[RFC v2][PATCH 4/9] Memory management - dump state

Dave Hansen dave at linux.vnet.ibm.com
Tue Aug 26 09:33:26 PDT 2008


On Sun, 2008-08-24 at 01:40 -0400, Oren Laadan wrote:
> >> +/* vma subtypes */
> >> +enum {
> >> +	CR_VMA_ANON = 1,
> >> +	CR_VMA_FILE
> >> +};
> > 
> > Is this really necessary, or can we infer it from the contents of the
> > VMA?
> 
> This classification eventually simplifies both dump and restore. For
> instance, it decides whether a file name follows or not.
> 
> There will be more, later:  CR_VMA_FILE_UNLINKED (mapped to an unlinked
> file), CR_VMA_ANON_SHARED (shared anonymous), CR_VMA_ANON_SHARED_SKIP
> (shared anonymous, had been sent before) and so on.

I still don't see there being a need to explicitly specify the
distinction.  Why should a VMA mapping an unlinked file be any different
from a linked one?  It should point over to the 'file' checkpoint
structure and let the real work be done there.

There are no truly anonymous shared areas.  They anon ones are still
file-backed as far as the kernel is concerned.  If we do the file saving
correctly, I think most of these problems just fall out.

> >>   struct cr_hdr_head {
> >>   	__u64 magic;
> >>
> >> @@ -83,4 +90,28 @@ struct cr_hdr_task {
> >>   	char comm[TASK_COMM_LEN];
> >>   } __attribute__ ((aligned (8)));
> >>
> >> +struct cr_hdr_mm {
> >> +	__u32 tag;	/* sharing identifier */
> > 
> > If this really is a sharing identifier, we need a:
> > 
> > struct cr_shared_object_ref {
> > 	__u32 tag;
> > }; 
> > 
> > And then one of *those* in the vma struct.  Make it much more idiot (aka
> > Dave) proof.
> 
> I figured the use of 'tag' for the identifiers of shared objects is clear.
> By using a __u32 the size of that field is immediately visible, while using
> a structure will hide the actual size; in turn this is what we want visible
> here (ABI), no ?

Either way you stack it, I think 'tag' is a horrendous variable name.
What kind of tag?  What does it do?  What does it tag?  What does it
reference?  What values are valid in there?

If we have a separate structure, we simply make it clear that the
structure will get used all over the place, and that it, too is part of
the ABI.  Knowing the sizes isn't as important as knowing that the ABI
is constant.

> >> +static int cr_vma_fill_pgarr(struct cr_ctx *ctx, struct cr_pgarr *pgarr,
> >> +			     struct vm_area_struct *vma, unsigned long *start)
> >> +{
> >> +	unsigned long end = vma->vm_end;
> >> +	unsigned long addr = *start;
> >> +	struct page **pagep;
> >> +	unsigned long *addrp;
> >> +	int cow, nr, ret = 0;
> >> +
> >> +	nr = pgarr->nleft;
> >> +	pagep = &pgarr->pages[pgarr->nused];
> >> +	addrp = &pgarr->addrs[pgarr->nused];
> >> +	cow = !!vma->vm_file;
> >> +
> >> +	while (addr < end) {
> >> +		struct page *page;
> >> +
> >> +		/* simplified version of get_user_pages(): already have vma,
> >> +		* only need FOLL_TOUCH, and (for now) ignore fault stats */
> >> +
> >> +		cond_resched();
> >> +		while (!(page = follow_page(vma, addr, FOLL_TOUCH))) {
> >> +			ret = handle_mm_fault(vma->vm_mm, vma, addr, 0);
> >> +			if (ret & VM_FAULT_ERROR) {
> >> +				if (ret & VM_FAULT_OOM)
> >> +					ret = -ENOMEM;
> >> +				else if (ret & VM_FAULT_SIGBUS)
> >> +					ret = -EFAULT;
> >> +				else
> >> +					BUG();
> >> +				break;
> >> +			}
> >> +			cond_resched();
> >> +		}
> > 
> > At best this needs to get folded back into its own function.  This is
> 
> This is almost identical to the original - see the preceding comment.

Exactly.  The code is copy-and-pasted.  If there's a bug in the
original, who will change this one?  Better to simply consolidate the
code into one copy.

> > pretty hard to read as-is.  Also, are there truly no in-kernel functions
> > that can be used for this?
> 
> Can you suggest one ?

This is where the mentality has to shift.  Instead of thinking "there is
no exact in-kernel match for what I want here" we need to consider that
we can modify the in-kernel ones.  They can be modified to suit both
existing and the new needs that we have.

> >> +	for (pgarr = ctx->pgarr; pgarr; pgarr = pgarr->next) {
> >> +		struct page **pages = pgarr->pages;
> >> +		int nr = pgarr->nused;
> >> +		void *ptr;
> >> +
> >> +		while (nr--) {
> >> +			ptr = kmap(*pages);
> >> +			ret = cr_kwrite(ctx, ptr, PAGE_SIZE);
> >> +			kunmap(*pages);
> > 
> > Why not use kmap_atomic() here?
> 
> It is my understanding that the code must not sleep between kmap_atomic()
> and kunmap_atomic().

Yes, but you're going to absolutely kill performance on systems which
have expensive global TLB flushes.  Frequent kmaps()s should be avoided
at all costs.

The best way around this would be to change the interface to cr_kwrite()
so that it didn't have to use *mapped* kernel memory.  Maybe an
interface that takes 'struct page'.  Or, one where we kmap_atomic() the
buffer, kunmap_atomic(), copy to a temporary buffer, then cr_kwrite().

> >> +static int cr_write_vma(struct cr_ctx *ctx, struct vm_area_struct *vma)
> >> +{
> >> +	struct cr_hdr h;
> >> +	struct cr_hdr_vma *hh = ctx->hbuf;
> >> +	char *fname = NULL;
> >> +	int flen = 0, how, nr, ret;
> >> +
> >> +	h.type = CR_HDR_VMA;
> >> +	h.len = sizeof(*hh);
> >> +	h.ptag = 0;
> >> +
> >> +	hh->vm_start = vma->vm_start;
> >> +	hh->vm_end = vma->vm_end;
> >> +	hh->vm_page_prot = vma->vm_page_prot.pgprot;
> >> +	hh->vm_flags = vma->vm_flags;
> >> +	hh->vm_pgoff = vma->vm_pgoff;
> >> +
> >> +	if (vma->vm_flags & (VM_SHARED | VM_IO | VM_HUGETLB | VM_NONLINEAR)) {
> >> +		pr_warning("CR: unknown VMA %#lx\n", vma->vm_flags);
> >> +		return -ETXTBSY;
> >> +	}
> > 
> > Hmmm.  Interesting error code for VM_HUGETLB.  :)
> 
> :)  well, the usual EINVAL didn't seem suitable. Any better suggestions ?

-ENOSUP might be clearest for now.  "Your system call tried to do
something unsupported."

-- Dave



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