<div dir="ltr">I believe that anyone attempting a DOS by forcing on-chain settlement can do it just as easily with asymmetric delays than with symmetric delays.<div><br></div><div>If my goal is to waste the time-value of your money in a channel, in a world with symmetric delays, I could just publish the commitment transaction and you would have to wait the full delay for access to your funds. True. But with delays asymmetric as they are now, I can just as easily refuse to participate in a mutual close, forcing you to close on-chain. This is just as bad. In fact, I&#39;d argue that it is worse, because I lose less by doing this (in the sense that I as the attacker get immediate access to my funds). So in my assessment, it is a very active attack and symmetric delays are something of a mitigation. You are right that the balance of funds in the channel becomes a factor too, but note that there is the reserve balance, so I&#39;m always losing access to some funds for some time.</div><div><br></div><div>-jimpo</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 6:35 AM, ZmnSCPxj <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ZmnSCPxj@protonmail.com" target="_blank">ZmnSCPxj@protonmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div>Good morning Daniel,<br></div><span class=""><div><br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="m_9171480804960543891protonmail_quote" type="cite"><div dir="auto"><div>This makes a lot of sense to me as a way to correct the incentives for closing channels. I figure that honest nodes that have truly gone offline will not require (or be able to take advantage of) immediate access to their balance, such that this change shouldn&#39;t cause too much inconvenience.<br></div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">I was trying to think if this could open up a DOS vector - dishonest nodes performing unilateral closes even when mutual closes are possible just to lock up the other side&#39;s coins - but it seems like not much of a concern. I figure it&#39;s hard to pull off on a large scale.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div></span><div>Now that you bring this up, I think, it is indeed a concern, and one we should not take lightly.<br></div><div><br></div><div>As a purely selfish rational being, it matters not to me whether my commitment transaction will delay your output or not; all that matters is that it delays mine, and that is enough for me to prefer a bilateral close if possible.  I think we do not need to change commitment transactions to be symmetrical then --- it is enough that the one holding the commitment transaction has its own outputs delayed.<br></div><div><br></div><div>If I had a goal to disrupt rather than cooperate with the Lightning Network, and commitment transactions would also delay the side not holding the commitment transaction (i.e. &quot;symmetrical delay&quot; commitments), I would find it easier to disrupt cheaply if I could wait for a channel to be unbalanced in your favor (i.e. you own more money on it than I do), then lock up both our funds by doing a unilateral transaction.  Since it is unbalanced in your favor, you end up losing more utility than I do.  Indeed, in the situation where you are funding a new channel to me, I have 0 satoshi on the channel and can perform this attack costlessly.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Now perhaps one may argue, in the case of asymmetric delays, that if I were evil, I could still disrupt the network by misbehaving and forcing the other side to push its commitment transaction.  Indeed I could even just accept a channel and then always fail to forward any payment you try to make over it, performing a disruption costlessly too (as I have no money in this).  But this attack is somewhat more passive than the above attack under a symmetrical delay commitment transaction scheme.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Regards,<br></div><div>ZmnSCPxj<br></div></blockquote></div><br></div>